The Good, The Bad, and Polyamory – The Science of Sex Podcast Ep. 37! – DrZhana

Info@DrZhana.com

send me an email

The Good, The Bad, and Polyamory – The Science of Sex Podcast Ep. 37!

The Good, the Bad, the Polyamory

Goes Deeper

Nonmonogamy often gets a bad rep in our society, but also in academia. A lot of research conducted on polyamory has been biased, which shows a clear stigma among researchers. This makes it difficult to have clear and accurate statistics about nonmonogamy and open relationships. Thankfully, there are some studies out there that attempt to analyze this bias and why it occurs. This week, we had Amy Moors on to talk about a recent study that she co-authored on this subject!

Amy C. Moors, is the Director of the Social Science Research and Evaluation Program at Purdue University’s College of Engineering and a Research Fellow at Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute. This fall she’s honored to join Chapman University’s Department of Psychology as an assistant professor. She earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Women’s Studies from the University of Michigan. Dr. Moors’s research addresses the impact of inequity on people’s belonging, well-being, and satisfaction in intimate and professional contexts. In one line of research, she studies diverse expressions of sexuality. In her other line of research, she examines strategies for promoting equity in higher education. Dr. Moors has published more than 40 articles and chapters related to gender, sexuality, close relationships, and social inequalities. Recently, she was recognized by the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality as a “Rising Scholar.”

Foreplay

SKYN Condoms unveiled a new survey of 4000 people designed to analyze the behaviors, attitudes and preferences of sexually active millennials. The results showed that despite what people may claim, there is still heavy stigma against women who have multiple sexual partners. Also, fewer millennials are using dating apps, and women are (still) more likely to fake an orgasm versus men. Finally. it showed that older millennials are getting kinky – using toys like anal beads, handcuffs, and whips in bed.

Feedback

We are taking a break over the summer to get ready for Season 2 which will start airing in September! In the mean time, we would love to hear how we can make the podcast the best that it can be! If you have a few minutes, take this survey and let us know what you love, what we can do better, and anything else you want to tell us!

To listen to the latest episode and catch up on the ones you’ve missed, listen to us on:

iTunes

Google Play

Soundcloud

Stitcher

To help me keep bringing you this #legitsexscience, rate, review, and subscribe, and also please consider becoming a Patron! Find me at Patreon.com/DrZhana

If you would like to make a one-time donation, click here to support me via PayPal!

To keep up with the latest news in sex science and research, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

Questions? Suggestions? Comment below!

Related Posts

  • 11 Ways Sex Can Make You Healthier

    It’s not very often that we can say that something is fun and healthy, but lo and behold, sex happens to be both! Some of the positive health effects are more obvious, like the fact that sex is a bit of a workout (though, really, it depends on how vigorous your sex is) and it can improve your mood (duh). But some aren’t so obvious. Like for example, that sex and orgasms (well, mostly the orgasms) can strengthen pelvic floor muscles. As I mention in this Insider article I got interviewed for last week, orgasms cause the pelvic floor to contract,

  • Check Out The Latest Episode Of The Science Of Sex Podcast

    Episode #54: Cocktails Vs. Consent Happy belated New Year! Given that the holiday season is a time when a lot of people consume significant amounts of alcohol AND get frisky while under its influence, Joe and I thought we’d kick off 2019 with a Science of Sex Podcast episode that ties drinking and sexual consent. Specifically, how does being intoxicated impact people’s perceptions of their own and their friends’ ability to consent to sex? In her unusual “naturalistic bar study” (more on that in the podcast), Dr. Michelle Drouin from Purdue University enlisted drunken bar goers and their friends to take a

  • You Can Be in an Open Relationship without Going All the Way

    A lot of couples struggle to find complete sexual fulfillment in long-term monogamous relationships. However, opening up to consensual nonmonogamy carries its own set of challenges and fears. And the reality is, complete sexual and romantic openness (like, polyamory, for example) wouldn’t work for everyone either. Luckily, there’s a middle ground. Enter what the famous sex advice columnist Dan Savage called “monogamish”. “Monogamish” is a term to describe couples that are “…mostly monogamous but [engage in] some small amount of sexual openness,” as I explain in an interview for this Vice article “I Went to a Sex Resort to Try

Sign up for my email list and be among the first to learn when my new course on "Are open relationships right for you?", based on #legitsexscience, goes live!

Sign Up Now!

The Science of Sex Podcast

The Science of Sex Podcast

Listen to comedian, Joe Pardavila, and I sit down each week with a new sex researcher to talk about the latest information on anything and everything to do with sex.

FACEBOOK

4 days ago

Dr Zhana

‪PSA: No, guys, wanting to get pegged (anally penetrated) by a woman isn’t gay. Nor is your dick collaterally touching another guy’s dick during double penetration. Gay is being SEXUALLY ATTRACTED TO men. (And there’s nothing wrong with it.)‬ ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook