BDSM vs Rape Culture – The Science of Sex Podcast Ep. 19! – DrZhana

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BDSM vs Rape Culture – The Science of Sex Podcast Ep. 19!

Do consent-oriented communities (like BDSM) experience lower levels of rape culture?

Goes Deeper

A study published in 2016 in the Journal of Sex Research, aimed to explore whether communities that emphasize consent see less rape culture than our mainstream society. It compared various communities (college campuses, BDSM, and workplaces) to find out how the levels of sexism, victim blaming, sexual aggression and more stood. Turns out that the BDSM community saw the lowest level of these rape-culture associated ideas. To talk about this study, Joe and I interview the lead author on this study, Dr. Kathryn Klement.

Dr. Kathryn Klement is a feminist social psychologist who specializes in research examining attitudes about women’s sexuality, sexual violence, and reproductive justice.  She currently works at Bemidji State University where she teaches courses on human sexuality, women and gender, and research methods.

Foreplay

According to a survey, couples who argue are 10 times more likely to be happier and stay together versus couples who avoid talking about their problems. This doesn’t necessarily mean that couples who fight constantly are matches made in heaven, but it does suggest that talking through issues (i.e. strong communication) can contribute to a positive relationship.

Ever wonder if you’re really in love? Then you’re in luck because a medical test may soon be available to differentiate love or lust. Dr. Fred Nour, a neuroscientist based in Los Angeles, says that we could have this scientific technology by 2028. Using an MRI-type scanner, the test would be able to detect the presence of specific chemicals associated with feelings of love in the brain.

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